Getting it right!

It’s been a week of reflection over here. Picking up silly errors that we should have noticed before publication, working out why certain social media content soared and others failed. And it came after my last post on handling disappointment in communications.

So I thought I would launch a series of posts on how to avoid the most common mistakes – how to be the most effective communicator you can be.

This isn’t a groundbreaking topic, obviously. There are no shortage of articles and blogs talking about common mistakes that people make in communications, especially social media. Almost every communications or social media or marketing blog or website will have a version of this somewhere in their archives.

You might think this is just another one of those same-same posts, another bunch of posts on “common mistakes and how to avoid them”.

But its not.

I’m not talking to a company trying to tell their wares, or an individual trying to drive traffic and get ad clicks and likes.

I’m talking to you, the non-profit trying to get their voice heard in a sea of equally important voices.

The NGO trying to get your message to government bureaucracies to know your name, trying to win supporters and have them see the value in your work so they will donate to your cause, trying to encourage beneficiaries and local governments to come behind you and see the benefits…

Over the next little while, I will look at common communication mistakes – not just social media, but all media, and why these are a problem for you and your NGO. And then, obviously, what you can do to try to minimise them.

They include things like going to where your audience is (which means knowing where they are!), constantly reviewing and adapting your approach for success, and targeting your content for your audience and message.

So stay tuned over the next few weeks while I talk about how to avoid common mistakes NGOs make in their communications (especially with government) and what you should watch out for!

Not sure if you are making some of these mistakes? Get in touch!

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